For Beauty and Grandeur in the World We Build

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Events


On October 16, 2016, the National Civic Art Society hosted a lecture at the Cosmos Club in Washington, D.C. by Calder Loth, Senior Architectural Historian for the Virginia Department of Historic Resources. His subject was "Reconstructing Lost Architecture: A Commendable Tradition." He provided the arguments for rebuilding destroyed historic landmarks, and offers examples from around the world. Loth noted that the reconstruction of demolished historic structures has long been considered strictly forbidden. The loss of a significant building is usually considered to be an opportunity to rebuild with a structure reflecting a "contemporary" aesthetic and lifestyle. Nevertheless, a widespread popular sentiment holds that natural or man-made disasters should not deprive us of important heritage, and that accurate rebuilding of landmarks is a commendable activity since reconstructions serve emotional, patriotic, aesthetic, and educational needs. Moreover, the majority of reconstructions are serious, scholarly achievements. Time has shown that few people regret these resurrected buildings.

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On May 13, 2015 at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., the National Civic Art Society hosted a panel discussion on "New Urbanism and the Human Habitat: Beauty in the Natural and Built Environment."

Speakers:

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On July 18, 2014, at the U.S. House Rayburn Office Building in Washington, D.C., the National Civic Art Society hosted a briefing to discuss the current state of the Eisenhower Memorial and its future prospects. The panel concluded that the design is dead, and advocated for a new, open competition.

Speakers: